Sparks in the Night

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Jess. 26 years old. I love art, music, baking and star tipping.
He's blessed me with many gifts, including the gift of loving others tremendously [so let's be friends]. This is my walk with Him.

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bansheepower:

Falcon: 30% hero, 70% sass

bansheepower:

Falcon: 30% hero, 70% sass

bansheepower:

Falcon: 30% hero, 70% sass

bansheepower:

Falcon: 30% hero, 70% sass

bansheepower:

Falcon: 30% hero, 70% sass

Quote

I imagine my heart was being broken to make it bigger in order to embrace something I couldn’t have other wise.

— Cathe Laurie  (via h-o-r-n-g-r-y)

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allisonseto:

Lake Minnewanka // Banff, AB

allisonseto:

Lake Minnewanka // Banff, AB

allisonseto:

Lake Minnewanka // Banff, AB

allisonseto:

Lake Minnewanka // Banff, AB

allisonseto:

Lake Minnewanka // Banff, AB

allisonseto:

Lake Minnewanka // Banff, AB

Quote

Joy is the simplest form of gratitude.

— (via peterdwebb)

Quote

The testimony of those who have come through the dark: “they would not have chosen it, but they’d not give it back.”

— Barbara Brown Taylor (quoted by Jonathan Martin)

Quote

The testimony of those who have come through the dark: “they would not have chosen it, but they’d not give it back.”

— Barbara Brown Taylor (quoted by Jonathan Martin)

Quote

He wants them to learn to walk and must therefore take away His hand; and if only the will to walk is really there He is pleased even with their stumbles.

— C. S. Lewis, The Screwtape Letters (via yesdarlingido)

This novel. 🙌

(via carrlanne)

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thetimecametoblossom:canvas-bird:

thetimecametoblossom:

comedycentral:

Jon Stewart and Bill O’Reilly faced off over white privilege on last night’s Daily Show. Click here to watch the extended interview.

This is probably kinda beside the point, but the last gif is annoying me- don’t people get frisked because the police think they’ll find something on the person, in their pockets or something? Like drugs or weapons? Why would we frisk Wall Street bankers, what are we expecting to find, their secret evil plans to ruin the economy? Their manifesto on hating poor people? Do Wall Street bankers often commit crimes that can be thwarted by being frisked on the street?

His point is that your basic rights are violated, when police believe in “guilty until proven innocent”.  If you’ve walked into stores your entire life and been followed around because they think you’re stealing, you’d understand.  I know this because it happens to me a lot. It happens to my family members, people who have never stolen in their life.  But white privilege allows many to walk into a store, place something in their bag or pocket and walk out with no one the wiser.  If you’d ever been treated like a criminal, you’d understand. So please don’t undermine Jon Stewart’s point. I applaud any white person in this country that can see there’s something not right about our justice system while not being the victim.

I get that, but none of that was what I was referring to. I didn’t really state it clearly enough because I was on mobile and on a crunch for time when I first posted it. For the record, I do think that stop and frisk policies are bad (violations of the fourth amendment, specifically) and very often racially biased. So on that, sure, I don’t disagree. But I hate faulty logically connections (logic is a big thing for me lol), which is what ticked me off about what Jon Stewart said.
What I was irritated about in reference to what he stated was that he was making a really stupid equivalence here between the economy, bankers, and black people dealing with this experience. The connection he made in that last gif was essentially three things: 1) Some strange assumption/implication that police stop and frisk people because they’re worried about the economy, which is stupid. That’s obviously not the reason. 2) Bankers would be threatened by a search of their person. This is what I was trying (failed) to say in my above comment- bankers do not, in their stereotype or what have you, commit crimes that can be thwarted by a search of pockets. Probably a search of email or offices, though, not that that would be necessarily be justified either. 3) Stopping to frisk bankers would help the economy more than frisking black people helps the economy (like what even??). (kinda has to do with the first thing)  And there were some other things that had me annoyed by that last gif initially, but I am tired and can’t think anymore tonight.
It’s his dumb bankers and economy comment that had me irritated. The comment had virtually nothing to do with the above gifs or points being made. There’s really no connection between either thing and it’s just a really stupid point, imo. I get what he was trying to say, though. There had to have been a better way for him to connect the issue of police racism to another issue.
So yeah. I didn’t state clearly enough what I meant. My bad. :0 I hope this made sense.
I understand your confusion. Maybe he chose a poor metaphor if you’re looking at this in the literal sense of stop and frisk. But the truth is that there are too many black men in prison for the same crime many white men are guilty of but walk free.  There was a white man in Cleveland Ohio who racked up several DUIs. He never faced prison until his latest  drinking spree killed someone. They kept letting him go until he took someone’s life.  If you only sentence the same race of people they will fill your prisons.  It has nothing to do with bankers per se. Its the same thing as stopping someone in a store. He was just using the stereotype that black people kill anduse drugs while white people embezzle money. He could’ve worded it differently but I still agree with him.  This injustice hits very close to home for me. I have a family member serving a life sentence for being at the crime scene, even though it was someone else’s crime.
I think by the economy statement he was referring to businessmen who embezzle millions of dollars of hardworking employees pensions into their own pockets while the police are worried about the weed in another guy’s pocket. I won’t even get started on the fact that people are still facing prison sentences in some states for something that’s legal in other states.

thetimecametoblossom:canvas-bird:

thetimecametoblossom:

comedycentral:

Jon Stewart and Bill O’Reilly faced off over white privilege on last night’s Daily Show. Click here to watch the extended interview.

This is probably kinda beside the point, but the last gif is annoying me- don’t people get frisked because the police think they’ll find something on the person, in their pockets or something? Like drugs or weapons? Why would we frisk Wall Street bankers, what are we expecting to find, their secret evil plans to ruin the economy? Their manifesto on hating poor people? Do Wall Street bankers often commit crimes that can be thwarted by being frisked on the street?

His point is that your basic rights are violated, when police believe in “guilty until proven innocent”.  If you’ve walked into stores your entire life and been followed around because they think you’re stealing, you’d understand.  I know this because it happens to me a lot. It happens to my family members, people who have never stolen in their life.  But white privilege allows many to walk into a store, place something in their bag or pocket and walk out with no one the wiser.  If you’d ever been treated like a criminal, you’d understand. So please don’t undermine Jon Stewart’s point. I applaud any white person in this country that can see there’s something not right about our justice system while not being the victim.

I get that, but none of that was what I was referring to. I didn’t really state it clearly enough because I was on mobile and on a crunch for time when I first posted it. For the record, I do think that stop and frisk policies are bad (violations of the fourth amendment, specifically) and very often racially biased. So on that, sure, I don’t disagree. But I hate faulty logically connections (logic is a big thing for me lol), which is what ticked me off about what Jon Stewart said.
What I was irritated about in reference to what he stated was that he was making a really stupid equivalence here between the economy, bankers, and black people dealing with this experience. The connection he made in that last gif was essentially three things: 1) Some strange assumption/implication that police stop and frisk people because they’re worried about the economy, which is stupid. That’s obviously not the reason. 2) Bankers would be threatened by a search of their person. This is what I was trying (failed) to say in my above comment- bankers do not, in their stereotype or what have you, commit crimes that can be thwarted by a search of pockets. Probably a search of email or offices, though, not that that would be necessarily be justified either. 3) Stopping to frisk bankers would help the economy more than frisking black people helps the economy (like what even??). (kinda has to do with the first thing)  And there were some other things that had me annoyed by that last gif initially, but I am tired and can’t think anymore tonight.
It’s his dumb bankers and economy comment that had me irritated. The comment had virtually nothing to do with the above gifs or points being made. There’s really no connection between either thing and it’s just a really stupid point, imo. I get what he was trying to say, though. There had to have been a better way for him to connect the issue of police racism to another issue.
So yeah. I didn’t state clearly enough what I meant. My bad. :0 I hope this made sense.
I understand your confusion. Maybe he chose a poor metaphor if you’re looking at this in the literal sense of stop and frisk. But the truth is that there are too many black men in prison for the same crime many white men are guilty of but walk free.  There was a white man in Cleveland Ohio who racked up several DUIs. He never faced prison until his latest  drinking spree killed someone. They kept letting him go until he took someone’s life.  If you only sentence the same race of people they will fill your prisons.  It has nothing to do with bankers per se. Its the same thing as stopping someone in a store. He was just using the stereotype that black people kill anduse drugs while white people embezzle money. He could’ve worded it differently but I still agree with him.  This injustice hits very close to home for me. I have a family member serving a life sentence for being at the crime scene, even though it was someone else’s crime.
I think by the economy statement he was referring to businessmen who embezzle millions of dollars of hardworking employees pensions into their own pockets while the police are worried about the weed in another guy’s pocket. I won’t even get started on the fact that people are still facing prison sentences in some states for something that’s legal in other states.

thetimecametoblossom:canvas-bird:

thetimecametoblossom:

comedycentral:

Jon Stewart and Bill O’Reilly faced off over white privilege on last night’s Daily Show. Click here to watch the extended interview.

This is probably kinda beside the point, but the last gif is annoying me- don’t people get frisked because the police think they’ll find something on the person, in their pockets or something? Like drugs or weapons? Why would we frisk Wall Street bankers, what are we expecting to find, their secret evil plans to ruin the economy? Their manifesto on hating poor people? Do Wall Street bankers often commit crimes that can be thwarted by being frisked on the street?

His point is that your basic rights are violated, when police believe in “guilty until proven innocent”.  If you’ve walked into stores your entire life and been followed around because they think you’re stealing, you’d understand.  I know this because it happens to me a lot. It happens to my family members, people who have never stolen in their life.  But white privilege allows many to walk into a store, place something in their bag or pocket and walk out with no one the wiser.  If you’d ever been treated like a criminal, you’d understand. So please don’t undermine Jon Stewart’s point. I applaud any white person in this country that can see there’s something not right about our justice system while not being the victim.

I get that, but none of that was what I was referring to. I didn’t really state it clearly enough because I was on mobile and on a crunch for time when I first posted it. For the record, I do think that stop and frisk policies are bad (violations of the fourth amendment, specifically) and very often racially biased. So on that, sure, I don’t disagree. But I hate faulty logically connections (logic is a big thing for me lol), which is what ticked me off about what Jon Stewart said.
What I was irritated about in reference to what he stated was that he was making a really stupid equivalence here between the economy, bankers, and black people dealing with this experience. The connection he made in that last gif was essentially three things: 1) Some strange assumption/implication that police stop and frisk people because they’re worried about the economy, which is stupid. That’s obviously not the reason. 2) Bankers would be threatened by a search of their person. This is what I was trying (failed) to say in my above comment- bankers do not, in their stereotype or what have you, commit crimes that can be thwarted by a search of pockets. Probably a search of email or offices, though, not that that would be necessarily be justified either. 3) Stopping to frisk bankers would help the economy more than frisking black people helps the economy (like what even??). (kinda has to do with the first thing)  And there were some other things that had me annoyed by that last gif initially, but I am tired and can’t think anymore tonight.
It’s his dumb bankers and economy comment that had me irritated. The comment had virtually nothing to do with the above gifs or points being made. There’s really no connection between either thing and it’s just a really stupid point, imo. I get what he was trying to say, though. There had to have been a better way for him to connect the issue of police racism to another issue.
So yeah. I didn’t state clearly enough what I meant. My bad. :0 I hope this made sense.
I understand your confusion. Maybe he chose a poor metaphor if you’re looking at this in the literal sense of stop and frisk. But the truth is that there are too many black men in prison for the same crime many white men are guilty of but walk free.  There was a white man in Cleveland Ohio who racked up several DUIs. He never faced prison until his latest  drinking spree killed someone. They kept letting him go until he took someone’s life.  If you only sentence the same race of people they will fill your prisons.  It has nothing to do with bankers per se. Its the same thing as stopping someone in a store. He was just using the stereotype that black people kill anduse drugs while white people embezzle money. He could’ve worded it differently but I still agree with him.  This injustice hits very close to home for me. I have a family member serving a life sentence for being at the crime scene, even though it was someone else’s crime.
I think by the economy statement he was referring to businessmen who embezzle millions of dollars of hardworking employees pensions into their own pockets while the police are worried about the weed in another guy’s pocket. I won’t even get started on the fact that people are still facing prison sentences in some states for something that’s legal in other states.

thetimecametoblossom:canvas-bird:

thetimecametoblossom:

comedycentral:

Jon Stewart and Bill O’Reilly faced off over white privilege on last night’s Daily Show. Click here to watch the extended interview.

This is probably kinda beside the point, but the last gif is annoying me- don’t people get frisked because the police think they’ll find something on the person, in their pockets or something? Like drugs or weapons? Why would we frisk Wall Street bankers, what are we expecting to find, their secret evil plans to ruin the economy? Their manifesto on hating poor people? Do Wall Street bankers often commit crimes that can be thwarted by being frisked on the street?

His point is that your basic rights are violated, when police believe in “guilty until proven innocent”.  If you’ve walked into stores your entire life and been followed around because they think you’re stealing, you’d understand.  I know this because it happens to me a lot. It happens to my family members, people who have never stolen in their life.  But white privilege allows many to walk into a store, place something in their bag or pocket and walk out with no one the wiser.  If you’d ever been treated like a criminal, you’d understand. So please don’t undermine Jon Stewart’s point. I applaud any white person in this country that can see there’s something not right about our justice system while not being the victim.

I get that, but none of that was what I was referring to. I didn’t really state it clearly enough because I was on mobile and on a crunch for time when I first posted it. For the record, I do think that stop and frisk policies are bad (violations of the fourth amendment, specifically) and very often racially biased. So on that, sure, I don’t disagree. But I hate faulty logically connections (logic is a big thing for me lol), which is what ticked me off about what Jon Stewart said.
What I was irritated about in reference to what he stated was that he was making a really stupid equivalence here between the economy, bankers, and black people dealing with this experience. The connection he made in that last gif was essentially three things: 1) Some strange assumption/implication that police stop and frisk people because they’re worried about the economy, which is stupid. That’s obviously not the reason. 2) Bankers would be threatened by a search of their person. This is what I was trying (failed) to say in my above comment- bankers do not, in their stereotype or what have you, commit crimes that can be thwarted by a search of pockets. Probably a search of email or offices, though, not that that would be necessarily be justified either. 3) Stopping to frisk bankers would help the economy more than frisking black people helps the economy (like what even??). (kinda has to do with the first thing)  And there were some other things that had me annoyed by that last gif initially, but I am tired and can’t think anymore tonight.
It’s his dumb bankers and economy comment that had me irritated. The comment had virtually nothing to do with the above gifs or points being made. There’s really no connection between either thing and it’s just a really stupid point, imo. I get what he was trying to say, though. There had to have been a better way for him to connect the issue of police racism to another issue.
So yeah. I didn’t state clearly enough what I meant. My bad. :0 I hope this made sense.
I understand your confusion. Maybe he chose a poor metaphor if you’re looking at this in the literal sense of stop and frisk. But the truth is that there are too many black men in prison for the same crime many white men are guilty of but walk free.  There was a white man in Cleveland Ohio who racked up several DUIs. He never faced prison until his latest  drinking spree killed someone. They kept letting him go until he took someone’s life.  If you only sentence the same race of people they will fill your prisons.  It has nothing to do with bankers per se. Its the same thing as stopping someone in a store. He was just using the stereotype that black people kill anduse drugs while white people embezzle money. He could’ve worded it differently but I still agree with him.  This injustice hits very close to home for me. I have a family member serving a life sentence for being at the crime scene, even though it was someone else’s crime.
I think by the economy statement he was referring to businessmen who embezzle millions of dollars of hardworking employees pensions into their own pockets while the police are worried about the weed in another guy’s pocket. I won’t even get started on the fact that people are still facing prison sentences in some states for something that’s legal in other states.

thetimecametoblossom:

canvas-bird:

thetimecametoblossom:

comedycentral:

Jon Stewart and Bill O’Reilly faced off over white privilege on last night’s Daily Show. Click here to watch the extended interview.

This is probably kinda beside the point, but the last gif is annoying me- don’t people get frisked because the police think they’ll find something on the person, in their pockets or something? Like drugs or weapons? Why would we frisk Wall Street bankers, what are we expecting to find, their secret evil plans to ruin the economy? Their manifesto on hating poor people? Do Wall Street bankers often commit crimes that can be thwarted by being frisked on the street?

His point is that your basic rights are violated, when police believe in “guilty until proven innocent”.  If you’ve walked into stores your entire life and been followed around because they think you’re stealing, you’d understand.  I know this because it happens to me a lot. It happens to my family members, people who have never stolen in their life.  But white privilege allows many to walk into a store, place something in their bag or pocket and walk out with no one the wiser.  If you’d ever been treated like a criminal, you’d understand. So please don’t undermine Jon Stewart’s point. I applaud any white person in this country that can see there’s something not right about our justice system while not being the victim.

I get that, but none of that was what I was referring to. I didn’t really state it clearly enough because I was on mobile and on a crunch for time when I first posted it. For the record, I do think that stop and frisk policies are bad (violations of the fourth amendment, specifically) and very often racially biased. So on that, sure, I don’t disagree. But I hate faulty logically connections (logic is a big thing for me lol), which is what ticked me off about what Jon Stewart said.

What I was irritated about in reference to what he stated was that he was making a really stupid equivalence here between the economy, bankers, and black people dealing with this experience. The connection he made in that last gif was essentially three things: 1) Some strange assumption/implication that police stop and frisk people because they’re worried about the economy, which is stupid. That’s obviously not the reason. 2) Bankers would be threatened by a search of their person. This is what I was trying (failed) to say in my above comment- bankers do not, in their stereotype or what have you, commit crimes that can be thwarted by a search of pockets. Probably a search of email or offices, though, not that that would be necessarily be justified either. 3) Stopping to frisk bankers would help the economy more than frisking black people helps the economy (like what even??). (kinda has to do with the first thing)  And there were some other things that had me annoyed by that last gif initially, but I am tired and can’t think anymore tonight.

It’s his dumb bankers and economy comment that had me irritated. The comment had virtually nothing to do with the above gifs or points being made. There’s really no connection between either thing and it’s just a really stupid point, imo. I get what he was trying to say, though. There had to have been a better way for him to connect the issue of police racism to another issue.

So yeah. I didn’t state clearly enough what I meant. My bad. :0 I hope this made sense.

I understand your confusion. Maybe he chose a poor metaphor if you’re looking at this in the literal sense of stop and frisk. But the truth is that there are too many black men in prison for the same crime many white men are guilty of but walk free. There was a white man in Cleveland Ohio who racked up several DUIs. He never faced prison until his latest drinking spree killed someone. They kept letting him go until he took someone’s life. If you only sentence the same race of people they will fill your prisons. It has nothing to do with bankers per se. Its the same thing as stopping someone in a store. He was just using the stereotype that black people kill anduse drugs while white people embezzle money. He could’ve worded it differently but I still agree with him. This injustice hits very close to home for me. I have a family member serving a life sentence for being at the crime scene, even though it was someone else’s crime. I think by the economy statement he was referring to businessmen who embezzle millions of dollars of hardworking employees pensions into their own pockets while the police are worried about the weed in another guy’s pocket. I won’t even get started on the fact that people are still facing prison sentences in some states for something that’s legal in other states.

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spiritualinspiration:

Do you need strength today? Sometimes it’s easy to get down and discouraged when you’re constantly looking at the circumstances of life. You may feel tired and weary from a long spiritual or emotional battle. But when you wait on the Lord, the Bible says your strength will be renewed.
Waiting on the Lord means you’re putting your trust and hope in Him. You’re living with an attitude of faith and expectancy. In the natural, if you are waiting for someone like a special dinner guest, you probably aren’t just sitting around the house wondering what will happen. No, you’re probably preparing for that special person, straightening the house and making sure everything is perfect for their arrival. Most likely, you started weeks in advance making the menu and deciding what to wear! In the same way, when you are waiting on the Lord, it doesn’t mean you are just sitting around. It means you are preparing for Him.
Are you ready for God to move on your behalf? Are you waiting on Him? As you take a step of faith, He’ll meet you there. He’ll renew your strength and lead you into victory in every area of your life! Prayer for Today:Father, thank You for Your promise to renew my strength. I choose to wait on You. I choose to trust You. I choose to prepare for You to move mightily in my life in Jesus’ name! Amen.

spiritualinspiration:

Do you need strength today? Sometimes it’s easy to get down and discouraged when you’re constantly looking at the circumstances of life. You may feel tired and weary from a long spiritual or emotional battle. But when you wait on the Lord, the Bible says your strength will be renewed.

Waiting on the Lord means you’re putting your trust and hope in Him. You’re living with an attitude of faith and expectancy. In the natural, if you are waiting for someone like a special dinner guest, you probably aren’t just sitting around the house wondering what will happen. No, you’re probably preparing for that special person, straightening the house and making sure everything is perfect for their arrival. Most likely, you started weeks in advance making the menu and deciding what to wear! In the same way, when you are waiting on the Lord, it doesn’t mean you are just sitting around. It means you are preparing for Him.

Are you ready for God to move on your behalf? Are you waiting on Him? As you take a step of faith, He’ll meet you there. He’ll renew your strength and lead you into victory in every area of your life!

Prayer for Today:

Father, thank You for Your promise to renew my strength. I choose to wait on You. I choose to trust You. I choose to prepare for You to move mightily in my life in Jesus’ name! Amen.

Palladium by Anarchei